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John Bonham

Beethoven

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Some seriously mind-blowing music. I'm listening to my wife play Moonlight Sonata on the piano and the synesthesia that's occurring is amazing. I can totally see how Beethoven felt when he was writing this music. So moody.

Anyway, Beethoven has always been my favorite. The 9th symphony is just perfect and the key to all the secrets of the universe. I can also sing the entire Ode to Joy in German. :canofworms:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aWmj1bMR4Mo

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DA NA DA NA DA NA DA NA DAAAAA, DA NA NA NAAAA, DA NA NA NAAAAAAAAA, DA NA NA DA, DA NA DA NA DA NA DA NA NAAAAAAAA, DA NA NA NAAAAAAAAA, DA NA NA NA...................

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Beethoven, Wagner... their music is an insurrection against the bourgeois society, against capitalism, against money, against commodity. They really are revolutionaries.

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One of the most technically intricate works of all time.

And then this is one of my favourites as well. Probably more pleasing to the average listening as well :lol:

Edited by Conor

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John, are we supposed to put Shuffle It All threads in Reckless Life or D&N?

Reckless Life is for all non-GNR topics.

I only put music threads in the GNR section if they are in some way remotely related to GNR.

For example: If Metallica releases a 3-D Blu-ray or ABBA has a reunion or Robert Plant says old rockers are boring, etc.

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Beethoven, Wagner... their music is an insurrection against the bourgeois society, against capitalism, against money, against commodity. They really are revolutionaries.

This is a summary of a very recommendable book by F. Pagnon about Wagner and music in general :

Francis Pagnon is the author of an important study of Richard Wager and the history music titled En Évoquant Wagner : La musique comme mensonge et comme vérité (in English, By Evoking Wagner: Music as Lie and as Truth) which was published by Editions Champ Libre in December 1981. This essay showed the living movement of history at work in music in general and in the music of Wagner, more specifically. It undertook a political critique “of mass[-produced] music as totalitarian ideology.” For the author, musical evolution has been liquidated and enslaved to the necessities of a retrograde organization of society. Due to its return to a pre-individual state, modern mass[-produced] music satisfies the need for annihilation and is only the hallucinatory submission to the violence inflicted by a society whose maintenance is only possible through coercion extended to all aspects of life.

Pagnon’s book gives an historical perspective on the contradictions of music in contemporary class society. The subtitle of the book, “music as lie and as truth,” refers to the lie that is mass[-produced] music and to the revolutionary truth expressed by great music, which the author considers to be the only real form of music, notably that composed by Monteverdi, Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Debussy and, of course, Wagner. For the author, Wagnerian music condemns capitalist society in which history is rendered impossible by a form of production that is enslaved to a perpetual cycle of exchange-value. Combat against this market vacuity develops beyond music, which becomes false when it denies the necessity of this combat by posing an aesthetic ideal in which the horrors of the world are compensated.

In its ultimate essence, Wagner’s music refuses this false role: it unreservedly confronts its enemy, that is to say, the musical tradition that is alienated from a social state of affairs that only exists through the crushing and irrational suffering of the subject. Wagner’s hatred of bourgeois society and its culture is part of his compositions. His music is a music of destruction: it reveals the chaos on which civilized barbarity is founded and calls for the destruction of an abhorred world.

Wagnerian music breaks the circle of non-life with the violence of a potential life that it demands to see become real. All of its grandeur incites the listener to the surpassing of music, to its realization. The moment at which market society is crumbling, art reveals its critical content, which had always been its truth in itself, rendered clear by the movement of history. The privilege of this crepuscular epoch was that it divulged the enigma of ancient art. Wagner’s music can, finally, show what it wants and to what it is dedicated.

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Edited by axlfan88

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I love Mozart, I really like Beethoven and I despise Wagner. That's my scale of preference of 3 of the most revered composers post 1750. I think Beethoven was on the cusp of a totally new sound in music and as a result some of his stuff I love, some I can't stand. I prefer his subtle, gentle music because the heavy stuff is too draining to listen to for me personally (which also explains my dislike for Wagner). My ultimate favourites for Beethoven are the Moonlight Sonata (one of the best pieces of music ever written) and the 5th. I also love Ode To Joy as I learnt to play it pretty well on the violin.

But I ultimately find more humanity from Mozart. He was so young when he composed all his music (he was dead before his 36th birthday) that there's an innocence AND a cheekiness in almost everything he did, combined with a grave sophistication that surpassed his age. What an extraordinary talent. I'd have loved to have met him and seen him in action the way I have my current day musical heroes.

Mozart's Symphony No. 40 (I was addicted to this for a while):

The piano concerto #23 in A major - Adagio. He wrote it when he was 30 and you can clearly hear a more mature, a more solemn man from the cheeky prodigy that wrote so much good stuff before his 20th birthday. This kind of expression only comes with age and its probably the truest expression of human vulnerability that I've ever encountered, the next being Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata.

And for the best 40 seconds ever composed in opera, EVER!!! (0:42-1:22). What Mozart makes this woman do with her voice is extraordinary! Axl can only dream of this:

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