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Axl molested by his dad

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Axl claims that he was molested by his dad at the age of 2. Most people can't remember anything from age 2, but Axl seems to remember. Despite this, he changed his name from Bailey to Rose, and named himself after the guy that allegedly molested him. Does something not sound right about this? If someone molested me, I would not name myself after him.

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You got it twisted. Some memories are stored subconsciously, Axl did regressional therapy and uncovered a big source of his anger towards his dad and women, because his mother did'nt do anything.

I don't know why he took back the name, but its stated as a F.U, to Mr. Bailey the pentacostel stepfather who physically abused the kids, I suppose.

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That was a repressed "memory" that Yoda "helped" Axl remember. There is no way to know if it really happened, but it did help distance Axl from his birth family. Mission Accomplished.

Thanks again Team Brasil.

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Regressional therapy is BS. It makes people recall things that never happened. Analyses showed that a majority of patients recall being raped in early childhood which is beyond resonable probability ratio. I don't know what it was like in Axl's case and I'm not saying it did not happen in his life but such situations are common. Generally it makes more harm than it gives benefit. And what's more it is not helpful. Recognizing the source of anger, even if it is real, changes nothing as far as dealing with it is concerned. I believe starting the therapy was a great mistake on the part of Axl. The therapy, if any, should be behavioral only. The latter can be helpful to some.

Axl generally sufferred from overanalyzing himself. Everyone has got their problems and everyone has got their anger. It is reasonable to try to learn to deal with this better in certain situations but Axl, it seems to me, wanted to change into a person he was not. And that cannot end in success. Accept who you are rather than try to be somebody else...

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Going to a regression hypnotist is a lot like hiring a consultant for your business.

You hire a consultant, he's coming back with a list of recommendations. He needs to justify his own expense. No consultant comes in and declares everything is fine, and keep doing what you are doing. They know when they are hired the business already thinks it has problems.

Regression hypnosis, same thing. Are they really going to put you under, than tell you all is well? Unlikely.

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Going to a regression hypnotist is a lot like hiring a consultant for your business.

You hire a consultant, he's coming back with a list of recommendations. He needs to justify his own expense. No consultant comes in and declares everything is fine, and keep doing what you are doing. They know when they are hired the business already thinks it has problems.

Regression hypnosis, same thing. Are they really going to put you under, than tell you all is well? Unlikely.

The difference is that business consultant doesn't talk you into believing that somebody did to you something that never happened. Regression hypnosis does. And then you need to live with what you recalled and what might just be total BS but that total BS stays with you till the end of your days and you remember it as if it really happened. Thank you very much.

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Axl: "My Dad F----- Me In The Ass"

(Originally published in Rolling Stone, April 2nd 1992, RS627)

RS: What's your earliest memory?

My earliest conscious memory was of a feeling that I'd been here before and that I had a toy gun in my hand. I knew it was a toy gun, and I didn't know how I knew. That was my first memory. But I've done regression therapy all the way back, just about to the point of conception. I kind of know what was going on then.

RS: Can you talk about what you've learned?

Just that ... my mom's pregnancy wasn't a welcome thing. My mom got a lot of problems out of it, and I was aware of those problems. That would tend to make you real fucking insecure about how the world felt about your ass. My real father was a pretty fucked-up individual. I didn't care too much for him when I was born. I didn't like the way he treated my mother. I didn't like the way he treated me before I was born. So when I came out, I was just wishing the motherfucker was dead.

RS: Talking about being conscious of things that happened before you were born might throw a few people.

I don't really care, because that's regression therapy, and if they've got a problem with it, they can go fuck themselves. It's major, and it's legit, and it all fits together in my life. Everything is stored in your mind. And part of you is aware from very early on and is storing information and reacting. Every time I realize I have a problem with something, and I can finally admit it to myself, then we go, "Okay, now what were the earliest stages?" and we start going back through it.

RS: What have you figured out?

I blacked out most of my childhood. I used to have severe nightmares when I was a child. We had bunk beds, and I'd roll out and put my teeth right through my bottom lip -- I'd be having some violent nightmare in my bed. I had these for years.

RS: Do you remember what the nightmares were about?

No, I only remember one dream. I dreamt I was a horse. You ever see those movies of wild mustangs running and how heavy that looks? I dreamt about that. I dreamt I was caught and then put in the movies. And in some really stupid movies. And it was totally against my will, and I could not handle it, and I freaked. I didn't understand the dream. Back then, I was like "I was a horse, they tried to put me in the movies!" You know, all I could think of at the time was Mr. Ed or Francis. But I always remembered that dream, and now I understand it real well. I didn't know what my nightmares were about. My parents had always said something really tragic and dark and ugly happened. They wouldn't say what happened--they always just freaked out whenever anything was mentioned about my real father. I wasn't told I had a real father until I was seventeen. My real father was my stepdad, as far as I knew. But I found some insurance papers, and then I found my mom's diploma, with the last name Rose. So I was never born Bill Bailey. I was born William Rose. I am W. Rose because William was an asshole.

RS: Your mother married your biological father when she was in high school?

Yeah. My mom's eyes actually turn black whenever it's brought up how terrible this person was. And what I found out in therapy is, my mother and him weren't getting along. And he kidnapped me, because someone wasn't watching me. I remember a needle. I remember getting a shot. And I remember being sexually abused by this man and watching something horrible happen to my mother when she came to ge me. I don't know all the details. But I've had the physical reactions of that happening to me. I've had problems in my legs and stuff from muscles being damaged then. And I buried it and was a man somehow, 'cause the only way to deal with it was bury the shit. I buried it then to survive -- I never accepted it. I got a lot of violent, abusive thoughts toward women out of watching my mom with this man. I was two years old, very impressionable, and saw this. I figured that's how you treat a woman. And I basically put thoughts together about how sex is power and sex leaves you powerless, and picked up a lot of distorted views that I've had to live my life with. No matter what I was trying to be, there was this other thing telling me how it was, because of what I'd seen. Homophobic? I think I've got a problem, if my dad fucked me in the ass when I was two. I think I've got a problem about it.

RS: Yeah, I would imagine so. What happened later?

After I was two, my mom remarried, and I was really upset by that. I thought I was the man in her life or something, because she got away from this man and now she was with me. You know, you're a baby.

RS: She was yours.

Yeah. And then she married someone else, and that bothered me. And this person basically tried to control me and discipline me because of the problems he'd had in his childhood. And then my mom had a daughter. And my stepfather molested her for about twenty years. And beat us. Beat me consistently. I thought these things were normal. I didn't know my sister was molested until last year. We've been working on putting our lives together ever since and supporting each other. Now my sister works with me. She's very happy, and it's so nice to see her happy and that we get along. My dad tried to keep us at odds. And he was very successful at some points in our lives.

RS: Where is your real father?

His brother called me right around the Stones shows, and I had my brother talk to him. I didn't talk to him, 'cause I needed to keep that separation. I haven't heard from him since. But I confronted my mom, and she finally talked to me a bit about it, and they told me that he was dead. It looks pretty much to be true that he is. He was pretty much headed for that anyway. A very unsavory character. I've had a problem with not wanting to be him. I had to be macho. I couldn't allow myself to be a real man, because men were evil, and I didn't want to be like my father. Around the Stones shows, some paper in L.A. wrote this piece about how "The truth will come out about Axl's anger," and they were making it look like I was trying to hide something. I wasn't trying to hide it. I didn't know what had happened to me. I wouldn't allow myself to know. I wouldn't have been able to handle it.

RS: How do you deal with knowing now?

It's not about going, "Well, I can handle it, I'm a man." And it's not about going, "Well, I forgive them now." You have to reexperience it and mourn what happened to you and grieve for yourself and nurture yourself and put yourself all back together. And it's a very strange, long chain. Because you find out your mother and father had their problems, and their mother and father had problems, and it goes back through the ages.

RS: How do you stop the cycle?

I don't know. It's finding some way to break the chain. I'm trying to fix myself and turn around and help others. You can't really save anyone. You can support them, but they have to save themselves. You know, you can live your life the way you have and just accept it, or you can try to change it. My life still has its extremes and ups and downs, but it is a lot better because of this work. I'm very interested in getting involved with child-abuse organizations. There's different methods of working with children, and I want to support the ones that I believe in.

RS: Have you talked to anyone yet?

I've gone to one child-abuse center. When I went, the woman said that there was a little boy who wasn't able to accept things that had happened to him and to deal with it, no matter how many children were around him who'd had the same problems. And apparently he saw something about me and childhood problems, and he said, "Well, Axl had problems, and he's doing okay." He started opening up, and he's doing all right. And that's more important to me than Guns n' Roses, more important to me than anything I've done so far. Because I can relate to that more than anything. I've had such hatred for my father, for women, for ...

RS: Yourself?

Yeah. Myself. And it's just made me crazy. I'm working on getting past those things, and the world doesn't seem to be too tolerant of me doing that in public. It's like "Oh, you got a problem? You go away and take care of it." All these relatives knew little pieces of this puzzle, and nobody helped me with shit. I'm angry about that. I can't sit and think about Uncle So-and-So and enjoy it much. And if you're talking with any of these people, they try to get you to just tolerate it and take things back to the way they were: "Let's not get it public." My family did everything they could, thinking they were doing what was right, to bury it all. My stepfather was just adamant that he was going to protect Mom and himself: "Your real father does not get brought up." And he was also trying to cover his own tracks for what he did.

RS: Why are you talking about this publicly?

One reason is for safety's sake. My stepfather is one of the most dangerous human beings I've ever met. It's very important that he's not in my life anymore or in my sister's. We may be able to forgive, but we can't allow it to happen again. There's a lot of reasons for me to talk about it publicly. Everybody wants to know "Why is Axl so fucked up?" and where those things are coming from. There's a really good chance that by going public I'm gonna get attacked. They'll think I'm jumping on a bandwagon. But then it's just gonna be obvious who's an asshole and who's not. There are probably people that are jumping on a bandwagon. But I think it's time. Things are changing, and things are coming out.

RS: It's only been in the last few years that people have really been talking about what constitutes abuse. I'm not talking about molestation but emotional abuse.

All parents are going to abuse their children in some way. You can't be perfect. But you can help your child heal, if he's able to talk to you. Then he can say, "You know, when I was five, I saw this." I wear a shirt onstage sometimes that says, TELL YOUR KIDS THE TRUTH. People don't really know what that's about. Up until early this year, I was denied what happened to me, who I was, where I came from. I was denied my own existence, and I've been fighting for it ever since. Not that myself is the greatest thing on earth. But you have a right to fight for yourself.

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This may not be a popular opinion, but it was that Rolling Stone interview from 1992 that I finally realized Axl was totally insane.

I must say I had exactly the same impression back then...

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This may not be a popular opinion, but it was that Rolling Stone interview from 1992 that I finally realized Axl was totally insane.

I must say I had exactly the same impression back then...

I was only 14 when the UYIs came out. But his behavior all throughout that summer was...well, a bit uneven, to be kind.

But I never thought he was completely nuts until that 'Rolling Stone' piece. I just kept trying to picture other frontmen of bands I liked at the time saying some of that stuff.

Can you imagine the stories Slash, Izzy or Duff could tell us if they really wanted to? For all the talk by Axl about how Slash doen him wrong, Slash could have BURIED him in that book, and did not. But I can only imagine some of the ramblings they had to sit through.

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This may not be a popular opinion, but it was that Rolling Stone interview from 1992 that I finally realized Axl was totally insane.

I must say I had exactly the same impression back then...

I was only 14 when the UYIs came out. But his behavior all throughout that summer was...well, a bit uneven, to be kind.

But I never thought he was completely nuts until that 'Rolling Stone' piece. I just kept trying to picture other frontmen of bands I liked at the time saying some of that stuff.

Can you imagine the stories Slash, Izzy or Duff could tell us if they really wanted to? For all the talk by Axl about how Slash doen him wrong, Slash could have BURIED him in that book, and did not. But I can only imagine some of the ramblings they had to sit through.

Ah, they probably feel somewhat protective over him, even after all the shit that has gone down. The lad just wasn't the full shilling.

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This may not be a popular opinion, but it was that Rolling Stone interview from 1992 that I finally realized Axl was totally insane.

I must say I had exactly the same impression back then...

I was only 14 when the UYIs came out. But his behavior all throughout that summer was...well, a bit uneven, to be kind.

But I never thought he was completely nuts until that 'Rolling Stone' piece. I just kept trying to picture other frontmen of bands I liked at the time saying some of that stuff.

Can you imagine the stories Slash, Izzy or Duff could tell us if they really wanted to? For all the talk by Axl about how Slash doen him wrong, Slash could have BURIED him in that book, and did not. But I can only imagine some of the ramblings they had to sit through.

I was also 14 when UYI came out :) And my thoughts were - Jesus, even if this all happened who in their right mind would want to talk about this in a magazine? :o I mean if something hurts and I assume something like this probably does, a sane person doesn't want the whole world of stupid assholes to make fun of them because of that or to laugh in their face.

Not to mention that even though it might be somebody's personal tragedy and nothing really funny, when talked about in that way, in a true Oprah style, it comes out pathetic, Micheal Jackson style, whimpy and stupid. So you just don't do it if you're sane. Yet Axl did it. And then he felt disappointed because of the reaction. A reaction he could not forsee even though I knew immediately what it's gonna be despite being 14. The guy has always been from another planet. As if he never lived on earth, not even for a while...

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And of course right after that came out, was the heavily bootlegged Chicago concert.

Again, I'd have to ask what other band does this :

- band makes you wit god knows how long

- band rips through 2 songs

- singer has band leave the stage

- singer then rants for 5 solid minutes about stupid bullshit

Talk about killing the mood. Imagine being in that crowd. Simply watching it on video years later, it seems like an eternity. Imagine being there live. It likely felt like he droned on for 20 minutes.

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And of course right after that came out, was the heavily bootlegged Chicago concert.

Again, I'd have to ask what other band does this :

- band makes you wit god knows how long

- band rips through 2 songs

- singer has band leave the stage

- singer then rants for 5 solid minutes about stupid bullshit

Talk about killing the mood. Imagine being in that crowd. Simply watching it on video years later, it seems like an eternity. Imagine being there live. It likely felt like he droned on for 20 minutes.

Well, his rants in particular I do not mind. I think it got to be so much part of Guns N Roses shows that people were rather disappointed when there were none :lol: Though this one was a little bit weird ...

I guess Axl thought he was doing something very good for those fans who had similar past experiences. Well, I don't know... He certainly did nothing good for himself though...

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Axl was so rich and so fucked up and so desperate for answers. He was a perfect mark for all those con artists. They worked him over pretty well.

He cast his therapist from that time as his therapist in a music video. Let that sink in for a moment. How unprofessional a therapist would you have to be to even consider that request from a patient?

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Axl was so rich and so fucked up and so desperate for answers. He was a perfect mark for all those con artists. They worked him over pretty well.

He cast his therapist from that time as his therapist in a music video. Let that sink in for a moment. How unprofessional a therapist would you have to be to even consider that request from a patient?

:lol:

That's a good point.

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Axl: "My Dad F----- Me In The Ass"

(Originally published in Rolling Stone, April 2nd 1992, RS627)

RS: What's your earliest memory?

My earliest conscious memory was of a feeling that I'd been here before and that I had a toy gun in my hand. I knew it was a toy gun, and I didn't know how I knew. That was my first memory. But I've done regression therapy all the way back, just about to the point of conception. I kind of know what was going on then.

RS: Can you talk about what you've learned?

Just that ... my mom's pregnancy wasn't a welcome thing. My mom got a lot of problems out of it, and I was aware of those problems. That would tend to make you real fucking insecure about how the world felt about your ass. My real father was a pretty fucked-up individual. I didn't care too much for him when I was born. I didn't like the way he treated my mother. I didn't like the way he treated me before I was born. So when I came out, I was just wishing the motherfucker was dead.

RS: Talking about being conscious of things that happened before you were born might throw a few people.

I don't really care, because that's regression therapy, and if they've got a problem with it, they can go fuck themselves. It's major, and it's legit, and it all fits together in my life. Everything is stored in your mind. And part of you is aware from very early on and is storing information and reacting. Every time I realize I have a problem with something, and I can finally admit it to myself, then we go, "Okay, now what were the earliest stages?" and we start going back through it.

RS: What have you figured out?

I blacked out most of my childhood. I used to have severe nightmares when I was a child. We had bunk beds, and I'd roll out and put my teeth right through my bottom lip -- I'd be having some violent nightmare in my bed. I had these for years.

RS: Do you remember what the nightmares were about?

No, I only remember one dream. I dreamt I was a horse. You ever see those movies of wild mustangs running and how heavy that looks? I dreamt about that. I dreamt I was caught and then put in the movies. And in some really stupid movies. And it was totally against my will, and I could not handle it, and I freaked. I didn't understand the dream. Back then, I was like "I was a horse, they tried to put me in the movies!" You know, all I could think of at the time was Mr. Ed or Francis. But I always remembered that dream, and now I understand it real well. I didn't know what my nightmares were about. My parents had always said something really tragic and dark and ugly happened. They wouldn't say what happened--they always just freaked out whenever anything was mentioned about my real father. I wasn't told I had a real father until I was seventeen. My real father was my stepdad, as far as I knew. But I found some insurance papers, and then I found my mom's diploma, with the last name Rose. So I was never born Bill Bailey. I was born William Rose. I am W. Rose because William was an asshole.

RS: Your mother married your biological father when she was in high school?

Yeah. My mom's eyes actually turn black whenever it's brought up how terrible this person was. And what I found out in therapy is, my mother and him weren't getting along. And he kidnapped me, because someone wasn't watching me. I remember a needle. I remember getting a shot. And I remember being sexually abused by this man and watching something horrible happen to my mother when she came to ge me. I don't know all the details. But I've had the physical reactions of that happening to me. I've had problems in my legs and stuff from muscles being damaged then. And I buried it and was a man somehow, 'cause the only way to deal with it was bury the shit. I buried it then to survive -- I never accepted it. I got a lot of violent, abusive thoughts toward women out of watching my mom with this man. I was two years old, very impressionable, and saw this. I figured that's how you treat a woman. And I basically put thoughts together about how sex is power and sex leaves you powerless, and picked up a lot of distorted views that I've had to live my life with. No matter what I was trying to be, there was this other thing telling me how it was, because of what I'd seen. Homophobic? I think I've got a problem, if my dad fucked me in the ass when I was two. I think I've got a problem about it.

RS: Yeah, I would imagine so. What happened later?

After I was two, my mom remarried, and I was really upset by that. I thought I was the man in her life or something, because she got away from this man and now she was with me. You know, you're a baby.

RS: She was yours.

Yeah. And then she married someone else, and that bothered me. And this person basically tried to control me and discipline me because of the problems he'd had in his childhood. And then my mom had a daughter. And my stepfather molested her for about twenty years. And beat us. Beat me consistently. I thought these things were normal. I didn't know my sister was molested until last year. We've been working on putting our lives together ever since and supporting each other. Now my sister works with me. She's very happy, and it's so nice to see her happy and that we get along. My dad tried to keep us at odds. And he was very successful at some points in our lives.

RS: Where is your real father?

His brother called me right around the Stones shows, and I had my brother talk to him. I didn't talk to him, 'cause I needed to keep that separation. I haven't heard from him since. But I confronted my mom, and she finally talked to me a bit about it, and they told me that he was dead. It looks pretty much to be true that he is. He was pretty much headed for that anyway. A very unsavory character. I've had a problem with not wanting to be him. I had to be macho. I couldn't allow myself to be a real man, because men were evil, and I didn't want to be like my father. Around the Stones shows, some paper in L.A. wrote this piece about how "The truth will come out about Axl's anger," and they were making it look like I was trying to hide something. I wasn't trying to hide it. I didn't know what had happened to me. I wouldn't allow myself to know. I wouldn't have been able to handle it.

RS: How do you deal with knowing now?

It's not about going, "Well, I can handle it, I'm a man." And it's not about going, "Well, I forgive them now." You have to reexperience it and mourn what happened to you and grieve for yourself and nurture yourself and put yourself all back together. And it's a very strange, long chain. Because you find out your mother and father had their problems, and their mother and father had problems, and it goes back through the ages.

RS: How do you stop the cycle?

I don't know. It's finding some way to break the chain. I'm trying to fix myself and turn around and help others. You can't really save anyone. You can support them, but they have to save themselves. You know, you can live your life the way you have and just accept it, or you can try to change it. My life still has its extremes and ups and downs, but it is a lot better because of this work. I'm very interested in getting involved with child-abuse organizations. There's different methods of working with children, and I want to support the ones that I believe in.

RS: Have you talked to anyone yet?

I've gone to one child-abuse center. When I went, the woman said that there was a little boy who wasn't able to accept things that had happened to him and to deal with it, no matter how many children were around him who'd had the same problems. And apparently he saw something about me and childhood problems, and he said, "Well, Axl had problems, and he's doing okay." He started opening up, and he's doing all right. And that's more important to me than Guns n' Roses, more important to me than anything I've done so far. Because I can relate to that more than anything. I've had such hatred for my father, for women, for ...

RS: Yourself?

Yeah. Myself. And it's just made me crazy. I'm working on getting past those things, and the world doesn't seem to be too tolerant of me doing that in public. It's like "Oh, you got a problem? You go away and take care of it." All these relatives knew little pieces of this puzzle, and nobody helped me with shit. I'm angry about that. I can't sit and think about Uncle So-and-So and enjoy it much. And if you're talking with any of these people, they try to get you to just tolerate it and take things back to the way they were: "Let's not get it public." My family did everything they could, thinking they were doing what was right, to bury it all. My stepfather was just adamant that he was going to protect Mom and himself: "Your real father does not get brought up." And he was also trying to cover his own tracks for what he did.

RS: Why are you talking about this publicly?

One reason is for safety's sake. My stepfather is one of the most dangerous human beings I've ever met. It's very important that he's not in my life anymore or in my sister's. We may be able to forgive, but we can't allow it to happen again. There's a lot of reasons for me to talk about it publicly. Everybody wants to know "Why is Axl so fucked up?" and where those things are coming from. There's a really good chance that by going public I'm gonna get attacked. They'll think I'm jumping on a bandwagon. But then it's just gonna be obvious who's an asshole and who's not. There are probably people that are jumping on a bandwagon. But I think it's time. Things are changing, and things are coming out.

RS: It's only been in the last few years that people have really been talking about what constitutes abuse. I'm not talking about molestation but emotional abuse.

All parents are going to abuse their children in some way. You can't be perfect. But you can help your child heal, if he's able to talk to you. Then he can say, "You know, when I was five, I saw this." I wear a shirt onstage sometimes that says, TELL YOUR KIDS THE TRUTH. People don't really know what that's about. Up until early this year, I was denied what happened to me, who I was, where I came from. I was denied my own existence, and I've been fighting for it ever since. Not that myself is the greatest thing on earth. But you have a right to fight for yourself.

 

None of this explains the Dolphins.

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