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arnold layne

I read books thread.

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Just read The Stand. . it's both amazing, and shit, at the same time...somehow.

If you are talking about Stephen King's The Stand, it's one of the greatest books ever!

I just started reading King's 11/22/63, really liking the book, especially the fact that the main character has just entered the year 1958 and is starting to live in Derry. Everyone who has read IT will know what I'm talking about :thumbsup:

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Well, IT turned out to be a giant shit animated spider.. Love that series, but the ending is shit. Which is one of the biggest tragedies of modern tv.

Anyway, I like the idea that a guy could become IT ! Makes for a great prequel.

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Just read The Stand. . it's both amazing, and shit, at the same time...somehow.

If you are talking about Stephen King's The Stand, it's one of the greatest books ever!

I just started reading King's 11/22/63, really liking the book, especially the fact that the main character has just entered the year 1958 and is starting to live in Derry. Everyone who has read IT will know what I'm talking about :thumbsup:

Yeah, it was King's The Stand.

Aye, it's a real page turner, and the characters are great, you just really start to feel they're real.

I guess I'm just not into stories about God, or the Devil, and all that bullshit. Also, I found the ending to be just awful...The hand appears and.. ah.. I just wasted a month of my compute for that???

Nah, ending aside, and the stupid old Black Woman.. it was a good read.

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Just read The Stand. . it's both amazing, and shit, at the same time...somehow.

If you are talking about Stephen King's The Stand, it's one of the greatest books ever!

I just started reading King's 11/22/63, really liking the book, especially the fact that the main character has just entered the year 1958 and is starting to live in Derry. Everyone who has read IT will know what I'm talking about :thumbsup:

Yeah, it was King's The Stand.

Aye, it's a real page turner, and the characters are great, you just really start to feel they're real.

I guess I'm just not into stories about God, or the Devil, and all that bullshit. Also, I found the ending to be just awful...The hand appears and.. ah.. I just wasted a month of my compute for that???

Nah, ending aside, and the stupid old Black Woman.. it was a good read.

I really thought the "fight" between Abigail and Flagg was great. Especially considering hat RF returns under several different names in King's books.

Well, IT turned out to be a giant shit animated spider.. Love that series, but the ending is shit. Which is one of the biggest tragedies of modern tv.

Anyway, I like the idea that a guy could become IT ! Makes for a great prequel.

I hav no idea what you are talking about...but the book is in my opinion he greatest book ever written.

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I'm starting on Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy right now. It's supposed to be one of the best books form a contemporary American writer. His books have been a good read and I really enjoy his prose most of the time, but I swear to got he tries too hard to be the Shakespeare of making up southern local dialects sometimes. I also purchased On Killing by Lt Col. Somebody. I know the OCS and military academies were having their officers read it, but I've also heard of a lot of holes punched through his theories.

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Nothing is more urgent than to open to the world the message meant to describe the laws of the Spirit. Mankind has no other common good.

Distinguished researchers suspect the existence of a single and unique pattern governing reality. But did the scattered body of sciences, including neurology, systemics, astrophysics, in spite of tremendous interdisciplinary efforts, ever identify one single universal constant? Mythologies and religions have long advocated a coherence that unifies the various fields of the Sacred. But how is it possible to isolate the universal vector that is responsible for unity? That is the subject of investigation that presents The Hidden Face of the Brain. This masterly book is the result of more than forty years of research. It brings to light the cortical code, the code of the archetypes of reality.

DOMINIQUE AUBIER starts from DON QUIXOTE, an initiatory treaty whose codes she deciphers and whose structure she reveals. It is in the story of the Knight that she finds the key to universality, where Cervantes had hidden it. With this tool, she was able to clarify the visions of the great Sufi IBN’ARABI from medieval hermetism. She relates The Mansions by Saint TERESA OF AVILA to the Treaty of the Palaces (The Zohar) by MOSES DE LEON. She gives the systemic explanation of the shamanic teachings of Juan Matus, the Native American sorcerer who was made known to the world by Carlos Castaneda. Including the Inuit, the Dogons, Buddhism or the Tch’an and Zen tradition, the author demonstrates that all expressions of human wisdom and spirituality can be explained by using the structure of the human brain as a model. The reader is invited to an exploration, a voyage to the frontiers of the functional laws of the cortex. These functions replicate and reproduce the image of the structural model at work in the universe. With this tool, the reader can test the validity of these discoveries on his own.

In this work, systematists will find the unifying principle, the identification of the structural model that underlies reality as well as its functional laws. Applicable to all fields of investigation, in social sciences as well as in management, ethnology, politics, it is an extraordinary presentation of the organic laws of Life. The book gives a clear presentation of the codes, acts and decrees found in all of our surroundings. Faced with the reality and this power, we have the choice to learn its order and layout.

The Hidden Face of the Brain is supported by extensive scientific documentation, which permits a close study of the logic of life and evolution. The book also offers the reader the joy of participating in an in-depth investigation. Translated into several languages, The Hidden Face of the Brain reveals the founding code of universality, while respecting the diversity of reality.

The Hidden Face of the Brain is a two-volume set

Vol 1 : 242 pages 14,8 x 21 cm

Vol 2 : 384 pages, 14,8 x 21 cm

Source: http://www.dominique-aubier.com/crbst_47.html

crbst_Brain_201.jpg?v=2283v01lig58otcrbst_The_20Brain_202.jpg?v=2271jg1lig58os

BHAAAAAAAHAYAHAHAHAGAGAGAGAGAGAHAHAHAHA!

What a load of fucking cobblers!!!! :lol:

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Nothing is more urgent than to open to the world the message meant to describe the laws of the Spirit. Mankind has no other common good.

Distinguished researchers suspect the existence of a single and unique pattern governing reality. But did the scattered body of sciences, including neurology, systemics, astrophysics, in spite of tremendous interdisciplinary efforts, ever identify one single universal constant? Mythologies and religions have long advocated a coherence that unifies the various fields of the Sacred. But how is it possible to isolate the universal vector that is responsible for unity? That is the subject of investigation that presents The Hidden Face of the Brain. This masterly book is the result of more than forty years of research. It brings to light the cortical code, the code of the archetypes of reality.

DOMINIQUE AUBIER starts from DON QUIXOTE, an initiatory treaty whose codes she deciphers and whose structure she reveals. It is in the story of the Knight that she finds the key to universality, where Cervantes had hidden it. With this tool, she was able to clarify the visions of the great Sufi IBN’ARABI from medieval hermetism. She relates The Mansions by Saint TERESA OF AVILA to the Treaty of the Palaces (The Zohar) by MOSES DE LEON. She gives the systemic explanation of the shamanic teachings of Juan Matus, the Native American sorcerer who was made known to the world by Carlos Castaneda. Including the Inuit, the Dogons, Buddhism or the Tch’an and Zen tradition, the author demonstrates that all expressions of human wisdom and spirituality can be explained by using the structure of the human brain as a model. The reader is invited to an exploration, a voyage to the frontiers of the functional laws of the cortex. These functions replicate and reproduce the image of the structural model at work in the universe. With this tool, the reader can test the validity of these discoveries on his own.

In this work, systematists will find the unifying principle, the identification of the structural model that underlies reality as well as its functional laws. Applicable to all fields of investigation, in social sciences as well as in management, ethnology, politics, it is an extraordinary presentation of the organic laws of Life. The book gives a clear presentation of the codes, acts and decrees found in all of our surroundings. Faced with the reality and this power, we have the choice to learn its order and layout.

The Hidden Face of the Brain is supported by extensive scientific documentation, which permits a close study of the logic of life and evolution. The book also offers the reader the joy of participating in an in-depth investigation. Translated into several languages, The Hidden Face of the Brain reveals the founding code of universality, while respecting the diversity of reality.

The Hidden Face of the Brain is a two-volume set

Vol 1 : 242 pages 14,8 x 21 cm

Vol 2 : 384 pages, 14,8 x 21 cm

Source: http://www.dominique-aubier.com/crbst_47.html

crbst_Brain_201.jpg?v=2283v01lig58otcrbst_The_20Brain_202.jpg?v=2271jg1lig58os

BHAAAAAAAHAYAHAHAHAGAGAGAGAGAGAHAHAHAHA!

What a load of fucking cobblers!!!! :lol:

Yeah, books like that are for stupid woman who think this makes more sense that scientific research.

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Yeah, books like that are for stupid woman who think this makes more sense that scientific research.

Exactly! I used to go out with a girl whose mother was into all that cobblers and she’d think that just because some of these books talk about a bloke with a degree who did a bit of “research” for half an hour a few years back that it should actually be taken seriously. Throw some funny science words and the like in and it all sounds proper edgucashiun and that. :lol: Honestly mate she used to start banging on about metaphysics and “energies” and all that bollocks and I could literally feel myself start to twitch with the effort of being polite as my brain began to melt and leak out of my ears. :lol:

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Yeah, books like that are for stupid woman who think this makes more sense that scientific research.

Exactly! I used to go out with a girl whose mother was into all that cobblers and she’d think that just because some of these books talk about a bloke with a degree who did a bit of “research” for half an hour a few years back that it should actually be taken seriously. Throw some funny science words and the like in and it all sounds proper edgucashiun and that. :lol: Honestly mate she used to start banging on about metaphysics and “energies” and all that bollocks and I could literally feel myself start to twitch with the effort of being polite as my brain began to melt and leak out of my ears. :lol:

Ah man, you should have slapped her daughter right in the face for that, and asked her if she felt that energy..

Sill coo..

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Aah, you guys, just because it has'nt been proven does'nt mean the man could'nt be right. It is of no use practically and if you don't like philosophy, don't bother.

BUT, over the course of history, many, if not most, of the renowned scientist, were ridiculed for proposing (at the time) absurd and wild ideas. Only for them to be proven right, and without them and people of those likes, we would'nt have gotten very far.

You can think its ridiculous and some of it might be, but they at least think about it and bring ideas. What do you bring ?

Theres a lot of scam artists and shit like that, but you can't label them all. Its always easier to dismiss than to contemplate.

That being said, people should always be critical, but try to improve theories instead of shooting them down.

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Aah, you guys, just because it has'nt been proven does'nt mean the man could'nt be right. It is of no use practically and if you don't like philosophy, don't bother.

BUT, over the course of history, many, if not most, of the renowned scientist, were ridiculed for proposing (at the time) absurd and wild ideas. Only for them to be proven right, and without them and people of those likes, we would'nt have gotten very far.

You can think its ridiculous and some of it might be, but they at least think about it and bring ideas. What do you bring ?

Theres a lot of scam artists and shit like that, but you can't label them all. Its always easier to dismiss than to contemplate.

That being said, people should always be critical, but try to improve theories instead of shooting them down.

These people who faom on about "channeling their energy".... well, if only they could manage to channel some of that energy into getting a fucking job...

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Aah, you guys, just because it has'nt been proven does'nt mean the man could'nt be right. It is of no use practically and if you don't like philosophy, don't bother.

BUT, over the course of history, many, if not most, of the renowned scientist, were ridiculed for proposing (at the time) absurd and wild ideas. Only for them to be proven right, and without them and people of those likes, we would'nt have gotten very far.

You can think its ridiculous and some of it might be, but they at least think about it and bring ideas. What do you bring ?

Theres a lot of scam artists and shit like that, but you can't label them all. Its always easier to dismiss than to contemplate.

That being said, people should always be critical, but try to improve theories instead of shooting them down.

These people who faom on about "channeling their energy".... well, if only they could manage to channel some of that energy into getting a fucking job...

:awesome::rofl-lol:

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Aah, you guys, just because it has'nt been proven does'nt mean the man could'nt be right. It is of no use practically and if you don't like philosophy, don't bother.

BUT, over the course of history, many, if not most, of the renowned scientist, were ridiculed for proposing (at the time) absurd and wild ideas. Only for them to be proven right, and without them and people of those likes, we would'nt have gotten very far.

You can think its ridiculous and some of it might be, but they at least think about it and bring ideas. What do you bring ?

Theres a lot of scam artists and shit like that, but you can't label them all. Its always easier to dismiss than to contemplate.

That being said, people should always be critical, but try to improve theories instead of shooting them down.

These people who faom on about "channeling their energy".... well, if only they could manage to channel some of that energy into getting a fucking job...

Hahahaha! Tru dat! :lol:

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Dominique Aubier's books are really good, especially her essay about Don Quixote. Those who laugh are just stupid.

Marcus Rediker's books about pirates are awesome too.

He produced this splendid history of the hydra of working class resistance and organisation in the 17th and 18th centuries. It is a beautifully written celebration of the spirit of defiance of the untameable Promethean multitudes who ended slavery, and created the ideas of a cooperative political economy and culture, of those who 'dare seize the fire', in William Blake's words.

They show how sailors organised themselves, 'a motley crew', composed of people from all nations: the ship was a mode of production in the sphere of circulation, of trade. When London's sailors in 1768 struck (lowered) their sails, they added another weapon, and word, to the workers' armoury.

The authors trace the bloody birth of capitalism in 17th century England, and how capitalism spread through trade and colonisation around the Atlantic, expropriating the commoners of Africa, Ireland, England, Barbados and Virginia and imposing slavery. The years 1680 to 1760saw the rise of the British maritime state: by the 1690s, the Royal Navy was Britain's greatest employer. The authors approvingly cite James Rawley's comment, "In the decade of the 1730s England had become the supreme slaving nation in the Atlantic world" though surely England's ruling class, not the nation, owned the slave ships and ran the plantations.

They tell the stories of the waves of slave revolts and urban insurrections in 1730s and 1740s throughout British, French, Spanish, Dutch and Danish possessions, notably the New York Conspiracy of 1741 and Jamaica's Maroon War of the 1730s. In the 1760s and 1770s another wave of slaves' rebellions provided the arsenal of ideas that inspired the American, French and Haitian Revolutions.

Linebaugh and Rediker vividly depict the struggle against slavery and empire, against the pressgangs and brutality of the owners and employers. Using the rebels' own words and ideas, they tell the stories of those who fought for progress against those who owned the commons, ship, plantation and factory. They portray the revolutionary spirit of those who founded our trade unions, against the law.

189572.jpg

villana_a_p.jpg

Edited by axlfan88

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0882862375.JPG

Originally published in 1964 and long out of print, Joyce Kornbluh's Rebel Voices remains by far the biggest and best source on the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) history, fiction, songs, art and lore.

Besides the full text and illustrations of the original, this new and expanded edition includes 32 pages of additional material: a new introduction and updated bibliography by old-time Wobbly organizer and scholar Fred Thompson; an informative essay on Wobbly cartoons and cartoonists by Franklin Rosemont; more than 3 dozen additional cartoons and drawings and a useful index. 450 oversize pages crammed with the Wobblies in all their glory! [Not even the doughtiest of capitalism's defenders can read these pages without understanding how much glory and nobility there was in the IWW story, and how much shame for the nation that treated the Wobblies so shabbily." [NY Times Book Review on the 1964 edition]

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